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Damned When Dead Full Album Lyrics

Mael Mórdha - Damned When Dead cover art
Band
Album

Damned When Dead

(2013)
TypeAlbum (Studio full-length)
GenresDeath Doom Metal
Album rating :  –
Votes :  0
Lyrics > M > Mael Mórdha Lyrics (34) > Damned When Dead Lyrics (3)
Submitted by level 21 록스타 (2017-09-05)
1. Laudabiliter (5:16)
(In 1154 A.D. Nicholas Breakspear became Pope Adrian the IV, Vicar of Christ, ruler of the Roman Catholic Church. A renowned reformer, he strengthened the church’s power in Rome and then Rome’s power in Christendom. In 1155 A.D., after meeting with John of Sailsburg, envoy to Henry II, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, Anjou, Maine, and King of the English, Pope Adrian issned the Papal Bull “Laudabiliter” which along with a ring encrusted encrusted with emeralds, were brought back to Henry II.)


Failed once again by the men of the cloth.
Condemned by the chair of the Rock of Rome.
“Here be the parchment and an emerald crusted ring.
Go to those barbarians, teach them to sing
To the tune of its church and the hymn of its head.
I condemn those barbarians, leave them for dead
If they feel they cannot follow my rule then cast them to sea in a boat made for fools.

And one more thing that I do command
They part with their gold, the good and the bad
So that they do pay homage to the Vicar of Christ
And pay Peter’s Pence for the Church’s rigth
To create new temples and palaces for God
And his servants of course, for these be hard times.”
2. King of the English (7:20)
Any plans for invasion were over-ruled by Henry’s mother, the Emperess Matilda, and further scuppered by problems within the Plantagenet lands. Twelve years later however, a struggle between Diarmuid Mac Murchadha Ui Chennselaig, King of Laighin and Dubhlinn, and the High King of Éire and King of Connacht, Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, did awaken Henry’s designs for conquest once again.


Charged with the most pressing of tasks
We journey far from Laighin’s shore
In search of aid for my Righ’s cause
From he who styles himself King of the English.
The second Henry, great grandson of the bastard
Who wormed his way across the English channel
Deposing the Saxon (who were) weakened by Danes.
Old habits die hard…..landgrabbers.

So what be our fate. Vanquished of Victors.
Wolves gnaw at our heels so we ask the help of Lions.

To Wales where did begin our search.
To Fitzharding, De Barra and the Fleming.
O’er the March to the English plain – Saxon under the Gall Glassa’s yoke.
In London we’re told he be in France fighting to hold his third of that land.
Another voyage across the channel. Before the Saxon they deposed the French.

So what be our fate. Vanquished of Victors.
Wolves gnaw at our heels so we ask the help of Lions.
But to who will they turn when the wolves are gone?
Frank, Saxon, Scot and Welsh – In their fate I feel the answer.

Many days of travel by horse and foot through a land rich ev’n in the poverty of war
‘Till finnaly with the King of the English was my Righ granted an audience.

The Gall be strange, slaves to ceremony, all restrained – cold if you will.
Cruel, calculating but fierce in war. Is our fate to follow the Saxon and Frank?

Henry grants permission for troops to be gathered by my King in his name
By royal writ and we return to Britain.

So what be our fate. Vanquished of Victors.
Wolves gnaw at our heels so we ask the help of Lions.
But to who will they turn when the wolves are gone?
Frank, Saxon, Scot and Welsh – In their fate I feel the answer.
3. Dawning of the Grey (7:44)
Following the wanderings of Diarmuid and his secretary, Muiris Ó throughout the lands of Henry, - first to gain the favour, and second, to gather troops for his campaign to regain his kingdom – the first of the “Grey Foreigners” did arrive at Bannow Bay in 1169.

She be calm today, the most dangerous of waters.
Expanses of water as the eye can see.
Beyond its borders is where I’ll gain my victory
And salvage my crown, Laighin be for me.

Though my kingdom be ruined, my family be strong.
Time shall pass. Tighernán will be gone.
With the grey foreigner under my rule
‘Twill be Ruaidhrí our glorious king who will be made of fool.

Upstarts from Connacht his family be
Thinking ruler of that bog could one day be Ardrigh.
His mead must have been made much stronger than normal
If he felt he could become warmonger.

A wind slowly starts to rise from the east.
I can feel the salt sting my face, the time be near.
It will not be long ‘till they be here.
Our allies will help us to crush the pretender king.

A blackbird perched atop of the sun
Blinded by the darkness of Adrian’s Bull.
Spewing across the sea from his homeland
As the threat of his own kin does finnaly fall at the feet of the devils grey.

Dawn did break,
As did he bows of their ships – the water.
With their armour and helm – glittering in the sunrise
At the mouth of the bay known as Bannow.

The first of Bealtaine 1169, a date destined to strike fear and loathing
In the hearts of the Irish for near a millenium
As the sails were lowered.

While oar and the strength of man did the ships propel up to battle and bloodshed.
Victory… and the rise of the Grey
Beyond the mouth of the bay known as Bannow.

With a hastely gathered five hundred men did Diarmuid Mac Murchadha heal south.
While still more foreigners Grey under De Prendergast’s banner did land at Bannow.

And so to the Veisafjord did the warriors go Norman, Fleming, Welsh and Irish
To besiege the town of the Dubhghall
And teach the Norse a lesson in soldiery. Such a force of men as Diarmuid’s new troops were, had not been seen in Éire before, Exen with such a small number of soldiers. Mac Murchadha did achieve a dominance that rattled the other king. In sueing for peace it was agreed that Diarmuid would be reinstated as King of Laighin in return for him giving his son, Conchobhair, as a hostage to the High-King Ruaidhrí, and sendind home his new troops. Diarmuid, of course, had other ideas.

Ua Ruaire you bastard. Ua Conchobhair you fool.
In the name of Mac Murchadha do I rule
With Grey Foreigners at my command
All Éire will quake. The Kings wake
To the burning of their Dúns,
The waiting og their women
The crying of their children
And the death-moan of their men
As their souls leak from their rotting corpses
To whatever Gods do they believe in.

Did you really think, oh mighty Ard Righ
That I would send my warriors home
And once more groan under your yoke?
You misguided fool, soon we’ll do the battle
At my command
All Éire will quake. The Kings wake
To the burning of their Dúns,
The waiting og their women
The crying of their children
And the death-moan of their men
As their souls leak from their rotting corpses
To whatever Gods do they believe in.

Waiting for my time to come.
Hoping that my plans be not undone.
For my time it be at hand
To finnaly reclaim my land.

Horror. The Ard Righ still has my son.
Despair. He would not dare to kill my son.
Hostage. So I could turn to my land.
Ochone. My scheme undone by death’s hand
4. All Eire Will Quake (6:07)
5. Bloody Alice (Of Abergavenny) (5:40)
6. The Sacking of the Vedrafjord (5:06)
7. A Dirge (2:16)
8. Damned When Dead (8:10)
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